As In Mexico, Discovered The Tomb Of The Mayan Prince | The Science

 

 

The Science

As in Mexico, discovered the tomb of the Mayan Prince

According to "RIA Novosti", German archaeologists have found the tomb of the Mayan tribe in the ancient city Ushul in Mexico. The tomb is located in the state of Campeche, near Guatemala, near the border.

As in Mexico, discovered the tomb of the Mayan Prince

Ancient Mayan Indians in one of the few castles of their settlement did the ritual burial of a person occupying a high position in their society. Scientists from the University of Bonn, involved in the excavation, say that the remains belong to the prince of the dynasty of Calakmul. This family ruled the city for hundreds of years. The entire palace complex occupies an area of ​​130 by 120 meters. It consists of more than a dozen buildings. Ensemble erected in the time of prosperity of the above-mentioned authorities the names of about 650 AD. Excavations began to take place in 2011. But only in 2012, archaeologists have been able to detect the luxuriously decorated tomb. He built it followed after the rule of the dynasty of Calakmul - about 700 AD. The room inside the tomb is decorated with the help of rough stones. A burial chambers topped by an arch of log columns, which are characteristic of the Mayan civilization. The tomb contains the remains of the young man. He was buried with crossed arms in the chest. Around his body disposed of ceramic household items: 5 painted bowls and 4 courses. mummy's head was covered with ceramic tiles, which were using the ideogram painted store of information about the agricultural and natural cycles, the history of the Maya Culture and Astronomy. On one of the archaeologists Posudin read the letter, which translates as: "This cup is used for drinking prince." But the end of the scriptures according to the scientists can have two meanings: "the young people" and "Prince". Although archaeologists believe that the word "Prince" is more appropriate in the sense of, but still a foregone conclusion that the tomb was buried titlist, has no reason to. Scientists suggest that the young man is a relative of one of the rulers of the branches, but had no right to inherit the throne. His high status may indicate only the location of the tombs and ornaments of jade found in it.